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KCRG First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 

TODAY:  MOSTLY SUNNY.  HIGH 63.  NORTHEAST WIND 5-15 MPH. 

TONIGHT:  MOSTLY CLEAR.  LOW 36.  

TOMORROW:  PARTLY CLOUDY WITH ISOLATED SHOWERS POSSIBLE LATE IN THE DAY. 

                           HIGH 66.                          

EXTENDED OUTLOOK FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY: 

DRY.  HIGH’S IN THE 60’S & 70’S.  LOW’S IN THE 30’S & 40’S. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  11.9-FEET AND RISING


KCRG Weather Blog

Temperatures stay close to normal this week amid one small rain chance

The week has started with mild temperatures in the 70s. While they’ll drop into the 60s the rest of the week, that’s actually where they ought to be on a regular basis. The normal high in the last week of April is in the lower to middle 60s. There will be some ups and downs as a couple of cold fronts pass through, but nothing cold or sudden. One of those cold fronts comes through late on Thursday. There is a slight chance of showers as it passes by, but the odds of rain are looking pretty low. If any showers do develop, they will be light and isolated. At this point, sometime near the middle of next week has what should be a somewhat better chance of rain.

This month’s dry weather has one big benefit

While this looks to be a top-five dry April for many areas of eastern Iowa, there is a benefit to this. Dry soil tends to warm faster than moist soil. Given how cold it was around this area during the first three weeks of April, the soil temperatures undoubtedly need some help. Soil temperatures are averaging a rise of one to two degrees per day since the weather pattern flipped. At this pace, we should have 50 degrees four inches into the soil by this weekend! This is great news for the planting season to finally get going.

Cedar River a little high this week, Mississippi rises next week

Northern Iowa and Minnesota got slammed with numerous snowstorms over the past six weeks or so. Fortunately, much of the snow melted after each one, causing water to be gradually released into the rivers and haven't caused many flooding issues locally. The Cedar River came up last week and fell back a bit, but it’ll be running a little higher again this week. The Cedar River in Cedar Falls is forecast to cause minor flooding Tuesday morning through Thursday evening, cresting about a foot and a half feet above flood stage Wednesday. These are the expected impacts there: Water is at the edge of 1712 Cottage Row Road, the northeast corner of Tourist Park floods, water covers the north and south legs of Cottage Row Road south of Snag Creek, and water covers the bike path at George Wyth Park. The Cedar is forecast to rise a bit downstream in Waterloo down to Vinton, Cedar Rapids, and Conesville. Waterloo will have a small rise peaking around Wednesday, with the crest making it to Conesville this weekend. However, the river is expected to stay below flood stage in all these places. On the Mississippi, the snowmelt will lead to rises, but it will take some time for that to happen. It won’t be until early next week that the river will approach flood stage. Monitor upcoming forecasts if you’re affected by Mississippi River flooding.

The last week of April is going to actually feel like it

We’ve been plagued by a never-ending winter, but these last days of April are proof that spring is finally here. The normal high over the next week is the lower to middle 60s, and each afternoon will be pretty close to that. Overnight lows will also stay in the upper 30s to lower 40s, which is what’s typical for the end of April. As far as rain goes, there’s only one chance this week: Thursday afternoon into Thursday night. However, it’s not a guarantee that widespread showers will fall and it’s entirely possible very little, if any rain, will occur. This has been a fairly dry month for a good share of eastern Iowa – places near and south of Highway 20 are running at less than half the normal precipitation for the month. There is a benefit to the dry soil, however. It’ll warm relatively quickly, which we need because soil temperatures are running well behind average.

Extreme drought south of Iowa

While the talk recently has been snow and cold, there have been limited updates on the wildfires south of us. Within the areas of critical fire danger lies an intensifying drought. Droughts don’t usually get as much attention as other weather because they’re not exciting. They don’t blow things down, and they take weeks or months to fully develop. But they’re something meteorologists watch for, and when a drought forms in this part of the country, it’s important to take note. A northeast expansion of drought conditions could indeed occur over the next few months. Side note: This is the driest April on record so far at the Eastern Iowa Airport.