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KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR FRIDAY, JULY 19, 2019 

EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING IN EFFECT THROUGH 7PM SATURDAY NIGHT 

TODAY:  PARTLY SUNNY, HUMID AND DANGEROUSLY HOT.  HIGH 95.  SOUTHWEST

                WIND 10-20 MPH.  HEAT INDEX NEAR 105-115.               

TONIGHT:  MOSTLY CLEAR.  LOW 78. 

TOMORROW:  PARTLY CLOUDY AND DANGEROUSLY HOT.  SCATTERED SHOWERS AND

                           STORMS LIKELY IN THE LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING.  HIGH 95. 

                           (HEAT INDEX 100-110 DEGREES). 

EXTENDED OUTLOOK SUNDAY THROUGH TUESDAY: 

COOLER WITH SHOWERS AND STORMS POSSIBLE EARLY SUNDAY, DRY MONDAY AND TUESDAY.  HIGH’S IN THE 80’S.  LOW’S IN THE 60’S. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  14.1-FEET & STEADY

 


KCRG Weather Blog

Beyond the Weather: Our nearest neighbor

For the past week, many of us have relived the Apollo 11 mission. Many can pinpoint exactly where they were when they heard Neil Armstrong speak from the surface of the moon. The moon is one of the easiest targets we have in the sky. Sometime this weekend, take some time to go out and look beyond the weather at the lunar surface. As you look at the moon, you will see dark and light areas. You’ll see two large darks areas that almost resemble a snowman. The lower circle is the Sea of Tranquility, the area targeted for the Apollo 11 moon landing. The actual landing site, Tranquility Base, is toward the lower left. Did you also know you can see the moon during the day and not just at night? The next several days, look for the moon in the morning and midday sky. Look to the western sky any time after sunrise. The daytime moon can be seen the first few days following any full moon as long as the sky is clear. Happy stargazing!

The hotter the temperature, the rarer it is

Having a high temperature of at least 90 degrees is a common occurrence during the warm season in eastern Iowa. Over the past 30 years, Cedar Rapids has had an average of about 12 such days each year. Dubuque averages six, Iowa City has 23, and Waterloo comes in at about 15. However, pumping the temperature up a little further is harder. 95 or warmer happens just twice per year, on average, and there were numerous years that it didn’t happen at all. The same goes for Dubuque, and the average there is every other year. Iowa City comes in at five per year, with Waterloo getting two or three. 100 is a rare feat; it’s happened just five times in the past 30 years in Cedar Rapids. Dubuque has only one. Iowa City has had about a dozen. Waterloo comes in with six in the past 30 years, although five of them happened in 2012 alone!

The end of a heat wave is usually the worst

Think of a heatwave as a set of stairsteps. It starts off easy, but gets more intense through the event. The keys to a heatwave’s impact are trapped air, plenty of sunshine and progressively warmer nights which offer little relief. A day of 90, which is rather common for July, will translate to 95 after a few days, then to possibly 100 near the tail end of an extreme heat wave. By the end, you are ready for cooler weather! It does look like the heat will break by Sunday, with humidity relief by Monday.

Heat Safety: How to stay safe

High heat & humidity are in the forecast for Eastern Iowa over the next week. Heat is one of the top weather-killers in the United States. The heat index is a measurement to show how hot it feels outside. So although the temperatures may be 92°, combine that with the humidity and it could feel like 102°. What should you do during a heat event? • Wear light-colored clothing • Stay hydrated • Check on the elderly & small children • Don’t leave pets outside too long • Take frequent breaks • NEVER leave any pets of children inside of a car The inside of a car can quickly heat up to over 120 degrees in a matter of minutes on a hot day. This is unsafe for any person or pet. Make sure to always check the back seat before you get out a car.

Beyond the Weather: The dance of Jupiter and the moon

The upcoming weather pattern favors generally dry weather for Iowa. For outdoor activities, this is good news, including a chance to take time to look beyond the weather. The next several nights, a naked eye view of the southern sky allows us to watch the moon and Jupiter doing a dance. Thursday night and Friday night, about two hours after sunset when darkness has fully descended, look to the south and find the moon. The moon is in the waxing gibbous phase. To the left of the moon, look for a bright light. This is the planet Jupiter. As you again look Saturday and Sunday at the same time, the moon will pass by Jupiter as the giant planet will now appear to the right. Don’t confuse Jupiter with the star Antares, which is also bright. It’s just a little bit closer to the horizon than Jupiter in the southern sky. At the bottom of this article are images showing what to look for. One other note to make on your calendar is a partial lunar eclipse the night of July 16th. Unfortunately, you’ll have to view it through a live stream or photos, since it is not visible from North America. Happy stargazing!