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KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019 

TODAY:  PARTLY TO MOSTLY CLOUDY WITH SHOWERS AND STORMS POSSIBLE.  HIGH 74. 

                WEST WIND 10-20 MPH & GUSTY.                

TONIGHT:  MOSTLY CLEAR.  LOW 60. 

TOMORROW:  MOSTLY SUNNY.  HIGH 85. 

EXTENDED OUTLOOK WEDNESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY: 

DRY WEDNESDAY, A CHANCE OF SCATTERED SHOWERS AND STORMS THURSDAY AND FRIDAY.  HIGH’S IN THE 80’S.  LOW’S IN THE 60’S. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  14.1-FEET & FALLING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


KCRG Weather Blog

Difference between Dew Point, Relative Humidity, & Feels-Like Temperature

It is now officially the start of the summer season and we’ve been feeling the muggy conditions already in Eastern Iowa. When it gets hot, you may hear us use the terms dew point, relative humidity, or feels like temperature. Do you know the difference? Dew Point is the quantity of moisture in the air. The higher the dew point, the more moisture in the air. This is the most direct way of measuring humidity. Relative Humidity is shown in a percentage. It measures how close the air is to saturation. Just because there is a high relative humidity does not mean it will feel muggy outside. Feels like temperature is how the outside air feels to the human body when you combine air temperature and relative humidity. This is also known as the heat index. When you see dew points climbing above 65F on a hot summer day, then you know that's a day to take heat precautions. Drink plenty of water and take breaks indoors.

Rainfall totals for June 21, 2019

A line of thunderstorms, followed by a few hours of steady rain, brought a soaking rain to parts of eastern Iowa. The far north and east got far less, though. Oskaloosa: 1.30" Belle Plaine: 1.00" Cedar Rapids (Eastern Iowa Airport): 0.86" Tiffin (Clear Creek Amana HS): 0.84" Marengo: 0.71" Oxford: 0.70" Clutier: 0.69" Grinnell: 0.68" Dysart: 0.66" Marion (Marion HS): 0.56" Marshalltown: 0.56" Ottumwa: 0.55" Cedar Rapids (Jefferson HS): 0.54" Cedar Rapids (Washington HS): 0.54" Toledo: 0.54" Cedar Rapids (Metro HS:) 0.53" Marion (Linn-Mar HS): 0.50" Cedar Rapids (Kennedy HS): 0.46" Waterloo: 0.45" Cedar Falls (CF High School): 0.43" Cedar Rapids (Xavier HS): 0.40" Sigourney (Sigourney Jr-Sr HS): 0.40" Vinton (Vinton-Shellsburg HS): 0.39" Waterloo (East HS): 0.38" Waterloo (Expo HS): 0.37" Iowa Falls: 0.37" Solon (Lake Macbride): 0.36" Urbana: 0.33" Fairfield: 0.32" Quasqueton: 0.32" Mount Pleasant: 0.31" Iowa City (Regina HS): 0.30" Washington: 0.28" Iowa City (Airport): 0.27" Anamosa: 0.26" Central City (Howard Cherry Scout Res): 0.26" Wyoming (Midland HS): 0.21" Monticello: 0.17" West Branch: 0.15" Independence: 0.16" Dyersville (Beckman HS): 0.12" Manchester (West Delaware HS): 0.06" Clinton: 0.05" Dubuque (Hempstead HS): 0.05" Elkader (Central Community Schools): 0.04" Dubuque (Airport): 0.02" Dubuque (Senior HS): 0.02"

Beyond the Weather: The summer solstice

On Friday, June 21 at 10:54 a.m., the summer solstice will occur. The solstice is just a moment in time when the sun’s direct rays hit the Tropic of Cancer, and it marks the astronomical beginning of the summer season. This is the day that brings the longest daylight hours of the year. On June 21, we see 15 hours, 14 minutes and 19 seconds of daylight. Sunrise is at 5:31 a.m. and sunset at 8:45 p.m. From then on we lose daylight. The loss of daylight continues until the winter solstice. This year the astronomical start of the winter season is on December 21 when we will have nine hours, seven minutes and eight seconds of daylight. Welcome to summer!

Wettest Junes on record stay out of reach

With the return to a more active weather pattern – which isn’t unusual for this time of year, really – it’s worth taking a look back to what some of the wettest Junes have been. So far this month, Cedar Rapids has gotten about an inch and a third of rain. While there’s another week and a half left in the month, it’s highly unlikely we’ll come close to the June record of 13.29” set in 2014. Last June was very wet, too, coming in at seventh place with 9.32”. 37 years out of 126 on the record books got less than three inches of rain in June (about 30% of years), which shows that this is not often a dry time. Cedar Rapids’ top five wettest Junes #1: 13.29” in 2014 #2: 11.55” in 1969 #3: 11.06” in 1990 #4: 10.18” in 1924 #5: 9.68” in 2010 Dubuque’s top five wettest Junes #1: 14.16” in 1892 #2: 12.57” in 2014 #3: 10.87” in 1944 #4: 10.80” in 1925 #5: 10.49” in 1969 Iowa City’s top five wettest Junes #1: 10.89” in 2010 #2: 10.75” in 1993 #3: 9.78” in 1990 #4: 8.87” in 1947 #5: 8.74” in 2007 Waterloo’s top five wettest Junes #1: 12.43” in 1947 #2: 10.11” in 1993 #3: 9.63” in 2014 #4: 9.53” in 2018 #5: 8.97” in 2016

Weather pattern similar to April and May returns this weekend

While we did have a rainfall surplus in a few spots over the first two weeks of June, rainfall was largely below normal. That was quite welcome, but will soon be changing. Once again, we are heading down the path of nightly storm chances along with heavy rain potential. This is a pattern that’s similar to the one we had in April and May. The driver of this is a stalled high pressure system over the southern United States, along with a trough of low pressure stuck over the northwest U.S. This pattern will continue the rest of the month and heavy rainfall amounts are quite possible. As a result, you’ll see many rain icons on the 9-Day Forecast both on air and on our app. Realize that these chances do not last all day and in most cases, only encompass a few hours of the day. Timing and location will be clarified better as each storm complex develops.